Mysimplewebsite

Cache – Lazy Computers

We refer to it “Lazy Computers” who do not want to look for the new settings/files on the internet and constantly showing you the old detail. The only way to fix this is to clear your “cache files”.

A web cache is a mechanism for the temporary storage (caching) of web documents, such as HTML pages and images, to reduce bandwidth usage, server load, and perceived lag. A web cache stores copies of documents passing through it; subsequent requests may be satisfied from the cache if certain conditions are met

Reason/ways  to do this:

1) Download CClearner form our home page, (select the free installation)  install and press the “run” key on the right bottom. This will automatically clean out old internet files, history and data. Not to worry, you wont loose any information on your Computer.

2) Your internet browser shows old website information or “page could not be found. This again is caused by by old caching files on your computer. This can also cause email problems from time to time, especially if your hosting company changed servers. Sometimes it also work if you press the Ctrl and the F5 key on your keyboard together.

  • Open Run and enter CMD and press enter (See help below to get to this end)
  • Black screen will open.
  • Type the following in: ipconfig /flushdns and press enter
  • Done!

How to open Command Prompt on MAC:

How to open Command Prompt on Windows:

Open the Command Prompt window by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking All Programs, clicking Accessories, and then clicking Command Prompt.

 

How to clear your DNS cache

 

How to clear your DNS cache

The following methods allow you to remove old and inaccurate DNS information that may result in 404 errors.

 

Windows® 8

 

  1. Press Win+X to open the WinX Menu.
  2. Right-click on Command Prompt and select Run as Administrator.
  3. Type the following command and press Enteripconfig /flushdns
  4. If the command was successful, you will see the following message:
    Windows IP configuration successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.

 

Windows 7

 

  1. Click the Start button.
  2. Enter cmd in the Start menu search field.
  3. Right-click on Command Prompt and select Run as Administrator.
  4. Type the following command and press Enteripconfig /flushdns
  5. If the command was successful, you will see the following message:
    Windows IP configuration successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.

 

Windows XP, 2000, or Vista®

 

  1. Click the Start button.
  2. On the Start menu, click Run….
    • If you do not see the Run command in Vista, enter run in the Search bar.
  3. Type the following command in the Run text box: ipconfig /flushdns

 

MacOS® 10.7 and 10.8

 

  1. Click Applications.
  2. Click Utilities.
  3. Double-click the Terminal application.
  4. Type the following command:
    sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

    Warning: To run this command, you will need to know the computer’s Admin account password.

 

MacOS 10.5 and 10.6

 

  1. Click Applications.
  2. Click Utilities.
  3. Double-click the Terminal application.
  4. Type the following command: sudo dscacheutil -flushcache

Google to prioritise secure websites

Google has said it will give preference to more secure websites in its search rankings from now on.

The search engine has been testing highlighting pages that have HTTPS encryption by default, and will now roll out across its algorithms.

“We’ve seen positive results, so we’re starting to use HTTPS as a ranking signal,” Google said.

The decision could encourage more sites to turn on encryption, which makes them less vulnerable to hacking.

Encryption is used to digitally scramble data as it passes between a user’s device and an online service in order to prevent others eavesdropping on the information.

It is used by many, but not all, sites that show a little padlock and use a web address beginning HTTPS. The “S” stands for secure.

But for many firms across the web, adding encryption has to this point been an additional burden in terms of time and costs.

‘Best interest’

“Previously organisations have shied away from encryption due to cost concerns or fears of slowing website response times,” said Jason Hart, of the data protection consultancy SafeNet.

“But there are now high-speed encryption technologies available that mean cost and speed need no longer be an issue.

“So there really is no excuse for any data to be transmitted or stored in plain text.

“Every company wants to rank favourably on Google, so it’s in their best interest to ensure web pages are encrypted.”

Google said that – for the time being – whether a site was encrypted or not would not be a crucial factor in how they ranked sites.

“For now it’s only a very lightweight signal – affecting fewer than 1% of global queries, and carrying less weight than other signals such as high-quality content – while we give webmasters time to switch to HTTPS,” Google’s Zineb Ait Bahajji and Gary Illyes said in the blog post.

“But over time, we may decide to strengthen it, because we’d like to encourage all website owners to switch from HTTP to HTTPS to keep everyone safe on the web.”

David Drummond, Google’s chief legal officer, has previously said the US needed to change its approach to intelligence to restore trust in the internet.

In 2011, Google introduced HTTPS by default on its popular Gmail service.

Yahoo moved all its users’ data to secure servers in March 2014, and Facebook committed to secure browsing by default since July 2013.

The move of larger tech companies to encourage encryption comes after the leaks from Edward Snowden alleged that the National Security Agency (NSA) and GCHQ used various technologies to spy on citizens, which prompted a global debate about cyber-security and privacy.

This article was first published on bbc.om